Friday, May 10, 2013

Top 17 Terminal Commands Every Ubuntu user should know About

Terminal Commands are cool and very handy sometimes (even for common users who don’t like terminal), also useful in learning some cool stuffs about Ubuntu or GNU/Linux in general (so it’s also good for learners). I’ve prepared a list of few terminal commands – that anyone can learn and master (in couple of minutes), in order to enjoy a better experience with Ubuntu or other Linux distributions (and don’t worry about – the Ubuntu version you are using such as – 12.04 LTS – “Precise Pangolin” or 11.10 or may be the upcoming one – 12.10, because it doesn’t change often unlike the other things in Ubuntu :) , same for Ubuntu derivatives such as Linux Mint 13(Maya)). ubuntu-terminal

openSUSE Edu Li-f-e 12.3-1

openSUSE Education Team is proud to present Li-f-e (Linux for Education) 12.3-1. This first release is based onopenSUSE 12.3 with all the official updates applied. Li-f-e incorporates the latest stable versions of all popular desktop environments such as KDE, Gnome and Cinnamon. It includes wide range of software catering to everyone’s needs from the openSUSE Education repository, multimedia from the Packman repository, development tools, and KIWI-LTSP -that allows normal PCs or diskless thin clients to network boot from a server running Li-f-e and lot more. Everything you need to make your computer useful is available right out of the box as soon as Li-f-e is installed on it.     

Getting Started with Play Framework : Ubuntu/Linux Mint

What is Play Framework ?

Play Framework is a simple and powerful web development framework for Java/Scala. It’s very inspired from Ruby On Rails framework, so it’s like Rails, but for Java/Scala (initially it supported only Java, but now it also supports Scala (a programming language, very similar to Java, with some functional features, designed to be as a better Java)). Unlike other complicated java web development frameworks, Play is very simple and highly productive. play-logo Play is a lightweight, fast and highly scalable web development framework, with web friendly architecture and features (stateless, low resource consumption, reactive model based on Iteratee IO etc). So if you’re a Java/Scala developer, who want to develop cool web applications – then Play is a great choice for you.

Installing Play Framework

You must have Java installed (JDK 6 or later), read this tutorial on installing JDK in Ubuntu / Linux Mint if you haven’t already done that. When you’re done setting up java development kit, open a terminal and typejavac to make sure everything is setup properly. Download Play FrameworkDownload the latest version of Play (currently, it’s v2.1.0) and extract it to your Home Directory (it can be anywhere, but you should have write permission). Set Path Variable for Play Add the play to your path variable. Suppose, you have extracted the play framework to ~/packages/play-2.1.0 directory. Then open a terminal and type :
export PATH=$PATH:~/packages/play-2.1.0/
Now, if you type play at the terminal, you should have play command available.